New Open Virtual Platforms Processor Models for ARM, Imagination Technologies, RISC-V and Renesas Accelerate Software Development

Latest OVP Models and Virtual Prototype Software Release with iGen, Available Now

Oxford, United Kingdom, May 23, 2017 – Imperas Software Ltd., the leader in high-performance software simulation, today announced the availability of new Open Virtual Platforms (OVP) models for ARM, Imagination Technologies, RISC-V and Renesas processors, along with a new OVPsim software release including the iGen modeling tool.

For embedded software and hardware developers, virtual platforms are increasingly important, especially for multi-core designs. These new OVP library models, for ARM’s ARMv8.1 architecture for the Cortex-A family, Imagination Technologies MIPS I6400, Renesas RH850, and RISC-V, extend Imperas’ leadership in virtual prototyping. OVP models, APIs and the OVPsim virtual platform simulator support development and customization of instruction-accurate platforms for SoCs and larger systems for software development, debug and test.

The Open Virtual Platforms (OVP) portal delivers free, open source models for virtual platforms, as well as OVPsim simulation, and now iGen modeling software. The resources on this portal can significantly accelerate development and test for the embedded software world. New in this OVPsim release is also the iGen productivity tool for peripheral and platform building. All of these processor models are available now.

Rick O’Connor, Executive Director, RISC-V Foundation commented: “Imperas, a member of the RISC-V Foundation, has developed and released open source models of the RISC-V RV32I and RV64I cores through the Open Virtual Platformsä (OVPä) website. These virtual platforms and models enable early software development, long before hardware is available, help lower software development costs, increase quality, improve time to market, and reduce software development risks.”

Fast Processor Models are available as well for the Renesas RH850 microcontroller (MCU) family, commonly used for automotive applications such as power train, braking system and body control. This expands Renesas model support, including previously-released Renesas processor families such as the V850, RL78 and M16C. A video demonstration of OVP Fast Processor models for the Renesas RH8503GM processor and OVPsim, with the Green Hills Software MULTI debugger, is available here.

“Imperas and OVP are proud to provide these new models, along with virtual platforms for embedded software and hardware development,” said Simon Davidmann, president and CEO of Imperas. “And, our new iGen solution significantly accelerates custom model and virtual platform development.”

Imperas virtual prototyping solutions support a wide variety of OVP models and virtual prototypes, including processor models of Altera, ARM (including Cortex-A, R and M families), Imagination Technologies (MIPS), PowerPC, Renesas, RISC-V, Synopsys (ARC) and Xilinx cores. The addition of these new models expands existing Imperas and Open Virtual Platforms (OVP) platform support to over 170 processor models across a wide variety of vendors. For the latest list of Imperas models, please see the OVP website models page.  And follow Imperas on Linked In and twitter @ImperasSoftware.

About Imperas

For more information about Open Virtual Platforms and Imperas, please see www.ovpworld.org and www.imperas.com.

Imperas Virtual Platform Based Software Tools at DAC 2017

Virtual Prototyping in Demonstrations of Software Development Using Continuous Integration and Jenkins, Debug and Test, and a Tutorial on Linux Bring Up on Heterogeneous Multiprocessor SoCs

Oxford, United Kingdom, May 22, 2017 – Imperas Software Ltd., the leader in high-performance software simulation, today announced their participation at the Design Automation Conference (DAC) 2017, inviting developers of electronic products to register for a demonstration of Imperas virtual platforms for embedded software and systems development, debug and test at the Imperas booth in the World of IoT pavilion, booth #521.

DEMO HIGHLIGHTS: See Imperas virtual platform-based solutions for embedded software development, debug, analysis, and verification demos in the World of IoT pavilion, booth #521.

  • Imperas demos will show a wide variety of Open Virtual Platforms (OVP) models and virtual prototypes, with processor models of ARM (Cortex-A, M and R families), Altera, ARC, Imagination Technologies (MIPS), Renesas, RISC-V and Xilinx cores.
  • These demos will showcase the Imperas software Verification, Analysis and Profiling (VAP) tools, including OS-aware tools, plus heterogeneous multiprocessor/multicore debugging capabilities.
  • Imperas will show virtual platforms in a Continuous Integration / Continuous Test embedded software development environment using Jenkins, resulting in an efficient methodology to develop high-quality software.

TUTORIAL: Linux Bring Up on Heterogeneous Multiprocessor SoCs

  • Heterogeneous multiprocessor SoCs are common in applications such as advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous vehicles, networking, industrial automation, security, video analytics and machine learning.  These SoCs often have multiple homogeneous or heterogeneous clusters of CPUs, GPUs, and/or hardware accelerator units that work together on a common set of data. Linux, the general purpose operating system of choice for embedded systems, must be modified for these heterogeneous multi-cluster architectures to support coherence between clusters, as well as differences such as number of processors, processor type, and other features. Vendors often use an open source Linux distribution, then customize for the specific SoC, including drivers for the peripherals, other customizations and unique features.  Obviously, this gets quite complex, and the need to port, customize and bring up Linux on these heterogeneous SoCs requires significant engineering effort.  So how can developers be more efficient?  What are the best practices for Linux porting and bring up on heterogeneous multi-cluster/multiprocessor SoCs?
  • John Min, Solution Engineer at Imagination Technologies, covers components of the basic Linux kernel, device trees and other customizations, SMP variations, static and dynamic drivers, and coherency for multi-cluster architectures.  The methodology used for bring up of the Linux kernel, starting with boot loaders including U-boot, on hardware is presented.
  • Simon Davidmann, CEO of Imperas Software, discusses a robust debug and test environment based on virtual platform technology.  Virtual platforms provide a complementary approach to porting and bring-up on hardware, with benefits of controllability, observability and repeatability. Virtual platforms also enable easy automation of testing, as needed for an Agile Continuous Integration (CI) development and test methodology.  Specific OS-aware tools are also highlighted, plus non-intrusive memory monitors, the use of software assertions, and code and functional coverage techniques for operating systems and drivers.

WHEN AND WHERE: DAC 2017 is June 18-22 at the Austin Convention Center, Austin, Texas.

  • Exhibits are open June 19-21.
  • Imperas tutorial is Monday, June 19 from 10:30am- 12:00pm in room 17AB.

For more information, or to set up meetings with Imperas at DAC, please email sales@imperas.com

About Imperas

For more information about Imperas, please see http://www.imperas.com.

(Not so) Random Musings from RSA Conference 2017

Cesare Garlati, Chief Security Strategist, prpl Foundation

cesare-garlati-rsa-sf-2017The world’s great and good of the information security industry descended on San Francisco this week for RSA Conference 2017. On the surface, it looked like more of the same this year.  There weren’t a huge amount of new companies exhibiting this year and the traditional vendors all seemed to be consolidating and streamlining their product lines in attempt to demystify buyers.  It even saw the McAfee brand back this year after a noticeable absence in the previous “Intel Security” era.

What was extremely apparent, however, was a return to the future.  By this I mean the return of focus on securing  the endpoint.  From laptops, desktops and mobile phones, BYOD reared its head again under a different guise – Bring Your Own Anything.  The reason for this is likely the shift to the cloud and away from traditional on-premises offerings, where RSA vendors have typically focused in the past.  This trend has meant that as applications, services and virtual workloads move to the cloud and third parties, the corporate data centre is becoming less and less central to IT budgets.  As such, we are now seeing a trend where established vendors are following suit and looking once again the endpoint as a source of revenue, albeit from a slightly different perspective this time.

This difference comes in the form of Internet of Things (IoT) – which, based on the amount of presentations at RSA this year, is clearly of major significance within the industry.  Kaspersky jumped on the bandwagon and announced its platform for IoT and AT&T, IBM, Symantec and others announced an IoT Cybersecurity Alliance.

RSA Conference 2017
RSA Conference 2017

But is IoT just another buzzword? The scepticism comes from the fact that traditionally, RSA has been a datacenter/network security event.  Granted, network perimeters are changing significantly with the advent of things like the cloud and IoT, but I’m still unconvinced that people can define IoT successfully in this context.  It simply isn’t a problem that traditional network security is going to fix, as evidenced in prpl’s extensive research into how to secure the IoT. We know that security IoT has to start at the hardware level, and that traditional RSA conference vendors have little understanding of this space

It was encouraging to see a large presence by the not for profit Cloud Security Alliance that was poised to tackle the IoT issues and the crowd for the CSA seminar exceeded 1,400 – with queues out of the door for attendance.  Its approach, which advocates open standards, is one which prpl aligns itself with and it is heartening to see everyone coming together in an organised manner to undertake the problems associated with IoT security.

Finally, the last significant observation for me at RSA was the emerging role of identity  as it relates to securing corporate data.  There was a lot of innovation happening around the idea of making passwords obsolete and start-up UnifyID even took the RSA Innovation Sandbox contest with its implicit authentication platform that combines machine learning and the array of devices around us to match our bodies, and more specifically the way we move, to our identities.

It’s innovations like these and the group mentality of coming together to face security issues head on that mean RSA will be successful for years to come. It just needs scratching away at the surface to get to the real innovation: end to end security cloud to silicon.

Prpl takes part in IoTSF discussions on industry collaboration

Last Tuesday the prpl Foundation took part in the annual IoTSF conference in London. Art Swift, President on the prpl Foundation, took part in a panel Tuesday afternoon on “United We Stand; Addressing the Bigger Challenges of IoT Security with Collaboration”. The panel centered around the idea of the building an “Internet of Trust” and how security through collaboration can help. Along with Art, the panel featured John Hayne, chairman of the IoTSF, Paul Wilson of the Multos Consortium, Hugh Boyes of the IET, Idris Jahn from IoTUK and Aapo Markkanen, principle Analyst at Machina Research.iotsf

The panel began by asking each member how they see the IoT terrain changing over the next few years, and how can the current work being done by the IoTSF in promoting best practices in security could help this. The main theme throughout all answers was simple: trust. The IoT needs to invest in a supply chain of trust between manufacturers and consumers,with consumers being able to trust that the security of the products is up to standard, and that manufacturers will take the security of their products more seriously. Continue reading

Securing The Internet of (broken) Things: A Matter of Life and Death

If you’re like me you’ll probably be getting desensitized by now to the ever-lengthening list of data breach headlines which have saturated the news for the past 24 months or more. Targeted attacks, Advanced Persistent Threats and the like usually end up in the capture of sensitive IP, customer information or trade secrets. The result? Economic damage, board level sackings and a heap of bad publicity for the breached organization. But that’s usually where it ends.

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Open source software under attack – is the worst still to come?

What we can learn from the recent cyber attacks to the popular website GitHub and why we should worry about what is likely to come next.

github-attackOver the last few days the popular website GitHub has been the target of a massive Distributed Denial Of Service attack – DDoS, apparently originated from China. As I write this note, the GitHub status webpage now indicates “Everything operating normally” and “All systems reporting at 100%”. However, I am afraid the story is far from over and the worst may still be to come.

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